TRX MOVES OF THE WEEK: At-Home Collegiate Training

Episode 1 of 2

 

Justin Russ, TRX Senior Master Instructor and Strength & Conditioning Coach at The University of Virginia, is taking over this edition of TRX Moves of the Week! Watch Justin lead us through some of his favorite exercises and training concepts that he uses with his athletes to keep them in tip-top shape while they train at home. Check it out!

TRX Squat Jump with Reset

  • Adjust your TRX Suspension Trainer to mid-length and stand facing the anchor point.
  • Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, elbows by your sides and hands in front of you, while maintaining good, tall posture.
  • Sit your hips down and back to a ¼ squat, then forcefully explode up and jump as high as you can. Press down into the handles to assist in the jump.
  • Land as quietly as possible while holding a strong athletic position, which will resemble the ¼ squat depth.
  • Stand up and reset before performing the next rep.
  • As you master this movement, shorten the countermovement time. Attack the ground and be as explosive as possible during the jump, but always own your landing.

Justin Russ performing a TRX Jump Squat in a gymNote: The reset allows you to focus on bringing maximal intent and explosiveness to each rep, while owning and controlling your deceleration.

Eccentric TRX Lunge

  • Adjust the TRX Suspension Trainer to mid-calf length (single handle mode is optional) and stand facing away from the anchor point. Make sure that your suspended leg is in line with the anchor point, then take a small step forward so that the TRX Suspension Trainer is slightly angled toward you.
  • With your working leg rooted into the floor, level your hips and stand with a tall, proud chest.
  • Extend your arms at chest level, simultaneously pressing down and up on each hand to help contract your core.
  • Initiate your eccentric movement by pushing your hips back and bending both knees at the same time, all while making sure to maintain a vertical shin on your working leg.
  • The eccentric phase (the phase of forcibly lengthening your muscles) should be done to a 6-count. At the count of 6, you should have achieved full depth in the lunge, then forcefully explode out to return to start position.

TRX Master Instructor Justin Russ performing a TRX Lunge in a gymNote: Eccentric loading provides a great overload variable to continually stress muscle tissue during times when we may have limited access to free weights. I recommend starting off with lower volume (reps) and gradually progressing each week.

Eccentric TRX Single Arm Low Row

  • Adjust the TRX Suspension Trainer to mid-length, single handle mode, and stand facing the anchor point.
  • Bring your working hand to the handle and keep your thumb by armpit and elbow by your ribs. Your non-working hand is your “ghost hand.”
  • Find an active plank: quads and glutes locked in, ribs hidden, shoulders down and back, and eyes up at anchor point
  • Take a small step forward until you find tension should in your glutes, core, and upper back.
  • Initiate your eccentric movement by extending both arms, while maintaining an active plank
  • The eccentric phase should be done to a 6-count. At the count of 6, you should have fully extended your arms, rotating your thumbs to face each other on the way down. Squeeze your shoulder blades together as you corkscrew your hands to forcefully pull your thumb to your armpit. Drive your shoulder blades down as you return to start position.

Justin Russ performing a TRX Low Row in a gymNote: Eccentric loading provides a great overload variable to continually stress muscle tissue during times when we may have limited access to free weights. I recommend starting off with lower volume (reps) and gradually progressing each week.

TRX Body Saw

  • Adjust the TRX Suspension Trainer to mid-calf length, and set up on the ground while facing the anchor to put your toes into the foot cradles. Begin with your knees and forearms on the ground, a friendly position for the spine.
  • Lift your knees then find an active plank to make your body like a surfboard.
  • Slide your body back toward the anchor point and let your eyes move toward your elbows, all while maintaining an active plank.
  • Grip into the ground with hands and “pull” body back to starting position.

20_06_02_MOTW_Justin Russ_v08 (2)Note: I love this movement because it loads the core musculature eccentrically, which results in greater activation. Abdominal strains are common in many sports, so eccentric strength will be effective for overall health. Movement at the shoulders maps back to overhead pressing motion.

 

Thanks for following along and be sure to tune in next week for part two of TRX Moves of the Week: Training College Athletes from home! 

Check our Part 2 of the series here!

 

Justin Russ is currently an Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach at the University of Virginia, responsible for the design and implementation of training programs for the Cavalier Tennis & Squash programs. Prior to arriving in Charlottesville, Russ coached privately, working with professional tennis athletes on the ATP & WTA Tours, and was the Head of Tennis Performance at the IMG Academy in Bradenton, Florida from 2015-2018.

Throughout his career, Justin has worked with top-5 and top-10 tennis players, Olympic Gold Medalists, Grand Slam Champions, Junior Grand Slam Champions, NCAA National Champions, #1 ranked junior tennis players, and numerous NCAA Division 1 athletes of all sports.

A native of Buffalo, New York, Russ has been a Master Instructor for TRX since 2011. He has delivered over 100 live education courses in eight countries and has presented at a variety of industry conferences. Stay connected and follow him @coachjustinruss

TRX Coach Justin Russ

 


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