How TRX Develops Stability for Mobility

Posted on Mon, 21 Nov 2011 10:00:00 -08:00

In this video, TRX Head of Human Performance Chris Frankel shows you how to get the most out of your TRX Training by stabilizing your core, abs and back in order to generate force and strength with your movements.

“Proximal stability for distal mobility” is a fancy way of staying, “keeping your core stable so that you can keep everything else mobile.” The result of this concept, when executed to perfection (as Frankel is doing in the video), is what we call a “moving plank.” His core, hips and ankles are all staying relatively stable, while he is creating movement (flexion and extension) with his shoulders and elbows. Stability for mobility, got it?

Ok, so how does this translate into greater athletic performance, superior force transfer or just a more focused and efficient workout?

Force is most effectively transmitted through the body when the core is locked in, engaged and stable. This solid foundation is then leveraged with your mobile extremities (shoulders, arms, legs and hips) to channel their movement across the body. Think of your core, chest and back as lever at the end of a car jack. The more stable and solid that bar is, the more force will be transferred from the end of the handle down to the jack. Think of where the lever bar meets the jack as a shoulder joint. The more fluid and mobile this joint is, the easier it will be to move that lever through a full range of motion. So if you put that all together, what you get is the more stable your lever bar (core stability) and the more mobile and flexible your joints (distal mobility), the easier it will be to lift up the car (efficient transmission of power).

This is one of the really unique properties of TRX Training. Not only does it build your core strength, it also trains you to then use that core strength to generate and transfer power throughout the body. This translates to better athletic performance and more functional workouts. Watch the video as Frankel takes you through a few interesting ways of utilizing stability and mobility in your workouts.


Follow Us

Jump to Top